Ex-Obama officials push anti-American policies!

These Obamians, with the support of the New York Times, advocate that the Europeans actually cut some ties with the US to demonstrate their support for Iran and the JCPOA! Think about that for a second. These two former Obama administration officials are taking the position held not by the United States, but by Iran and it’s European enablers.

Who were these Bozos working for when they were in power? The United States? or some global elite?

And amidst all of this, we have the image of former SECSTATE John Kerry meeting not-so-secretly with Iranian officials–in support of what is, in effect, Iranian policy.

In my book that’s treason! Kerry has every right to differ on policy with trump. He has every right to speak his mind. But to travel abroad and meet with Iranians officials is treasonous!

Remember Charles Lindbergh? He disagreed with FDR’s policy regarding Nazi Germany. In 1936 and 1937 he toured Germany. He spoke well of Hitler and his regime, and on his return spoke against the policies of the Roosevelt administration. While many people considered Lindy a hero, others considered him a traitor.

Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s high representative for foreign affairs and security policy, reacted to Mr. Trump’s announcement with a sharp statement. The European Union and the rest of the international community, she said, would “preserve this nuclear deal.” The question is how. Notwithstanding an abundance of kvetching, European powers have not yet shown Mr. Trump that he has anything to fear from ignoring their wishes….

What can Europe do to get Mr. Trump’s attention? President Hassan Rouhani of Iran has indicated that his country will continue to adhere to the terms of the deal for the time being and deal with other parties to it in hopes of securing its benefits. This confers on the European Union, Britain and France — all of which are parties — some leverage. Acknowledging Iran’s compliance and continuing to do business with Iran without imposing sanctions would mitigate the effect of the White House’s sanctions and make it easier for advocates of the deal in Tehran to make their case.

The administration’s challenge — the American ambassador to Germany has already said that German companies doing business in Iran should wind down operations now — might prompt Europe to go further. The European Union could, for instance, announce the withdrawal of member-states’ ambassadors from the United States. Isn’t this what states do when diplomatic partners breach solemn agreements, expose them to security risks and threaten to wreak havoc on their economies? That is, after all, what the administration is threatening to do by courting the risk of a Middle Eastern war and applying secondary sanctions to European companies. Depending on the American response, European capitals might even follow up with expulsion of American ambassadors.